How to Create Custom Parts Washing Baskets for the Automotive Industry

How to Create Custom Parts Washing Baskets for the Automotive Industry
Custom parts washing baskets for automotive applications can help vehicle manufacturers improve their ability to meet production tolerances, reduce scrap production, and minimize production delays. To achieve these benefits, the parts washing basket has to be specially designed for the needs of the automotive manufacturer’s production...
Custom parts washing baskets for automotive applications can help vehicle manufacturers improve their ability to meet production tolerances, reduce scrap production, and minimize production delays. To achieve these benefits, the parts washing basket has to be specially designed for the needs of the automotive manufacturer’s production process.

Creating the perfect custom parts washing baskets for automotive applications is a multistep process that requires:

  1. Specific knowledge concerning the manufacturing application;
  2. Rigorous testing of design concepts;
  3. Extremely precise manufacturing techniques; and
  4. A commitment to meeting rigorous quality standards.

Here’s a glimpse into how Marlin Steel makes the perfect custom parts washing basket for almost any automotive application.

Step 1: The Custom Basket Questionnaire

Every custom basket design begins with the Marlin Steel team sending the client a questionnaire asking for the salient details of their manufacturing process. These questions cover a range of stress factors such as temperatures, chemicals used, part weights, and total process times that the engineering team can test the final basket design against later.

Other questions include specifics about any equipment the basket will come into contact with, such as the dimensions of the washing tank the basket will have to fit into, the dimensions of the parts to be held, and any conveyor or hoist systems that the basket will have to work with. Also, the questionnaire asks the client for any specific features they want/need the basket to have, such as handles, lids, hoist hooks, etc.

By collecting this information, Marlin’s engineering team can be confident that the custom basket design will not only meet the client’s minimum requirements, but also exceed them to be as efficient and effective as possible.

Step 2: Rigorously Test Various Designs

After collecting all of the critical details about the manufacturing process and the environment the basket will be used in, Marlin’s engineering team created a few different design concepts for testing using a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) program. This program breaks up the CAD file of the design into countless tiny pieces based on the shape and characteristics of the materials chosen for it (often a type of stainless steel) and checks the effects of all the stress factors revealed in the questionnaire on these pieces of the basket’s design.

On any given custom basket design project, Marlin might go through dozens of variants before settling on an optimal design.

This produces an incredibly reliable simulation of the effects of years of use on the basket design in mere moments. If there’s a deficiency in the design that would cause it to fail, the computer program makes a note of the failure and its cause so the designer can refine the design to prevent that failure in future testing.

Why computer simulations instead of physically making a basket prototype? One reason is that these software simulations are much faster than physical prototyping tests—taking minutes rather than months to complete. Another reason is that these tests can reveal flaws in a design that would not be apparent even after a month of rigorous real-world tests because they simulate years of use in minutes. So, problems that would only arise after prolonged use can be easily found. Finally, it saves on tooling, shipping, and materials costs for physical prototyping, helping clients save money as well as time.

The design is tested, refined, and tested again and again until it is able to pass the FEA testing without failing.

Step 3: Using Factory Automation to Achieve Precise Tolerances

In many automotive parts manufacturing applications, the tiniest error or flaw could compromise the safety and effectiveness of the final product—leading to safety recalls and bad press. When the parts washing baskets for an automotive manufacturing process are misshapen, they can interfere with equipment or allow parts to become damaged during processing, ruining delicate surfaces so they have to be rejected or reprocessed.

These manufacturing robots help Marlin's employees complete custom wire baskets quickly and consistently while maximizing quality.

To ensure that Marlin’s custom automotive baskets meet the millimeter-tight tolerances of its clients, the Marlin production team uses a variety of advanced manufacturing automation tools, including:

  • Wire bending robots
  • CNC press brakes
  • Laser cutting machines
  • MFDC welders
  • Stamping machines

Each of these machines produces incredibly consistent results without getting bored, tired, or stressed into making mistakes like a person would after hours of backbreaking work. Instead, they keep putting out consistent results in a fraction of the time it would take to do the same work with manual tools.

Marlin Steel is constantly on the lookout for new pieces of factory automation to expand its production capabilities—helping the Baltimore factory meet the needs of clients all over the globe!

Marlin’s ongoing commitment to delivering “Quality, Engineered Quick®” is the real secret sauce to the company’s success. This commitment to quality informs everything the company does—from its never-ending search for the best tools for the job, to the constant ongoing learning programs the company uses to keep employees on the cutting edge of manufacturing technology and knowledge.

An Example of a Custom Automotive Basket Manufacturing Process

Marlin once received a request to make a custom parts washing basket for very small hardened steel gears. Before designing a basket for the gears, Marlin’s team sent the client a custom basket questionnaire to verify the dimensions of the parts, their weights, and to discover the specifics of the process.

Here’s a recap of the information Marlin’s team received, and how they built the best basket possible for the client’s needs:

The Parts

Gears can come in all shapes and sizes, so Marlin's engineers needed specific information before designing a basket.

The parts to be washed in this process were a series of small gears made of hardened steel. The gears were 2.5” in diameter and 1.5” thick, with a 0.75” hole in the center. This arrangement could allow the gears to be held in several different ways.

For example, a set of vertical wire tines could be used to hold the gears in place by their holes as they laid flat, or the gears could be kept separate by a series of wire inserts that operate similar to the ones in a dish rack.

In this case, the client needed to be able to hold 20 gears at a time fully separated from one another, so the rack design was deemed the optimal layout, since it used less space.

Additionally, the parts had a strict no-scratch requirement. So, to keep the parts safe through the entire washing process, the basket would need to be coated with a layer of soft, thick polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coating to absorb shocks.

The cleaning machine in this process was a type of powered wash conveyor system with an opening about 15” wide. Because it was a conveyor system, the width of the basket might be limited to that opening’s width, but the only limit to the length of the basket was what would be easy for the automotive manufacturer to handle and what could easily support the distribution of weight from the held gears.

By using the rack design concept, the baskets could be made smaller and easier to handle while holding at least 20 gears. This would make it easier for the automotive company’s workers to load and unload the baskets, which would also help to save time during the production process.

The washing machine would use a variety of different surfactants and other chemicals in an aqueous wash process. In this regard, the PVC coating, which was meant to prevent the gears from getting scratched, would also be more than sufficient for withstanding exposure to the various chemicals specified by the client.

As an added bonus, when the coating does start to wear thin, it is easy enough to reapply for a fraction of the cost of building a whole new basket. This would help to maximize the useful life of the basket and keep the total cost of ownership down.

Testing the Design

Color coded FEA results make it easy to see if a design passed or failed.

Before a single piece of wire for the basket was ever unspooled and shaped, the design of the basket needed to be thoroughly verified against the use conditions specified by the client. Yes, the PVC coating should be able to hold up, but that needed to be verified before time and materials would be expended.

Marlin’s engineering team put the basket’s design through a battery of virtual physics simulations. Our FEA software studied the effects of various stresses on the basket’s design—simulating years of use in seconds. If there was any damage or bending—even as little as the width of a human hair—would be logged as a failure, with causes noted.

Using the data from these simulations, the engineering team would identify issues in the design and fix them. Only once the design could pass through a simulation of years of use was it considered ready for production.

Building the Baskets with Factory Automation

Production itself was carried out using extensive factory automation, which helped to ensure that each and every basket would meet the client’s exacting tolerances—from the first basket to the 100th basket.

The end result was that, in a span of less than two weeks, the client went from placing their order for custom parts washing baskets to having the kind of top-quality baskets they needed to keep production on-schedule in their factory.

Source: www.marlinwire.com